What types of debts are not dischargeable in a chapter 7 case?

All debts of any type or amount, including out-of-state debts, are dischargeable in a chapter 7 case except for the types of debts that are by law nondischargeable in a chapter 7 case.  The following is a list of the most common types of debts that are not dischargeable in a chapter 7 case:

  1. Most tax debts and debts that were incurred to pay nondischargeable federal tax debts.
  2. Debts for obtaining money, property, services, or credits by means of false pretenses, fraud, or a false financial statement, if the creditor files a complaint in the bankruptcy case.
  3. Debts not listed on the debtor’s chapter 7 forms, unless the creditor knew of the bankruptcy case in time to file a claim.
  4. Debts for fraud, embezzlement, or larceny, if the creditor files a complaint in the bankruptcy case.
  5. Debts for domestic support obligations, which include debts for alimony, maintenance, or support, and certain other divorce-related debts, including property settlement debts.
  6. Debts for intentional or malicious injury to the person or property of another, if the creditor files a complaint in the bankruptcy case.
  7. Debts for certain fines or penalties.
  8. Debts for most educational benefits and student loans, unless a court finds that not discharging the debt would impose an undue hardship on the debtor and his or her dependents.
  9. Debts for personal injury or death caused by the debtor’s operation of a motor vehicle, vessel or aircraft while intoxicated.
  10. Debts that were or could have been listed in a previous bankruptcy case of the debtor in which the debtor did not receive a discharge.
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